Slane has a medieval bridge and an 18th century
road carrying 21st century articulated traffic…
The only long-term solution to the
ongoing traffic problem in Slane
is the construction of the bypass.

crash
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TRAFFIC SAFETY IN SLANE

The topography of Slane features a steep descent of c.800m along the N2 from the northern side of the village down to the bridge over the River Boyne. To make the descent, traffic must negotiate two particularly sharp bends, one which leads directly onto the narrow medieval bridge. The vast majority of crashes have occurred along this steep stretch of road and in particular on the approaches to, and on the bridge itself. (Please see map below)

village map

The other major factor contributing to the apalling road safety situation in Slane is the volume of traffic passing through the village and in particular the number of HGVs. The latest traffic figures from Meath County Council show that 1600 trucks pass through the village of Slane each day. Nearly all collisions involve out-of-control trucks on the stretch of road highlighted above.

There are 22 white crosses set on the wall on the Mill Hill which represent the number of people killed on the roads in Slane over the last 40 years. The last fatality was in 2001 when a two-year-old child was killed. A truck crushed him to death when it mounted his mother’s car while she was stopped at traffic lights on the Mill Hill.

Some remedial measures were installed on the Mill Hill following this incident including the gantry-mounted traffic lights and non-slip surfacing. However, although they may indeed have saved lives, these measures have not prevented the numerous incidents to have taken place on this section of road since. They were completely ineffective in relation to the major crash on the 23rd March 2009. Traffic lights cannot stop trucks whose brakes have failed.

The overwhelming position is that the only effective long-term solution to the traffic problem in Slane is the construction of the promised bypass. In the meantime, it is clear that there remains a very pressing need for the implementation of effective road safety measures.

WE ARE LOBBYING THE FOLLOWING:

MEATH COUNTY COUNCIL to
1. Implement the HGV ban passed by councillors in April 2009
2. Immediately install additional traffic calming measures including:
Pedestrian-controlled crossings, e.g. at the school and the new playground. Installation of speed cameras and electronic flashing signage giving vehicle speeds and warning of the steep gradients ahead.
3. Apply to Bord Pleanála for permission to commence construction of the bypass as soon as possible.

NATIONAL ROADS AUTHORITY and GOVERNMENT to
1. Prioritise the Slane Bypass in Government’s Transport 21 Strategy.
2. Seek assurances re. funding to allow construction to begin as soon as planning process is complete.

3. Apply to Bord Pleanála for permission to commence construction of the bypass as soon as possible.

 

 

crosses

blackspot

Survivors

ganrties

Hotel

square

2001 Mill Hill

2001 march

 

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Contact us at bypassslanecampaign@gmail.com

Bypass Slane Campaign, c/o Slane Community Forum, The Village Inn, Slane, Co. Meath.